April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

You may see blue ribbons, blue pinwheels, street banners and signs in your local community to remind you that child abuse and neglect continues to be a community health issue. For the third year in a row the United States had a rise in the number of children who experienced child abuse and neglect according to a report published by the Administration on Children, Youth, and Families on January 23, 2017.

In 2015, both the number of estimated child fatalities because of abuse or neglect (1, 670) and the national fatality rate (2.25 percent) were both the highest in at least five years. Educators made the most referrals to child protective services at 18.4 percent, followed by legal and law enforcement personnel (18.2 percent), social services personnel (10.9 percent), medical professionals (9.1 percent), mental health professionals (5.8 percent) and others.

Children ages 0-5 are most at risk of child abuse and neglect. In 2015, 74.8 percent of all child fatalities in the United States were children under the age of 3. This age group is most vulnerable because they are unable to escape the abuse and neglect, talk about it to others, or be seen at school where most reports are made by educators. Children ages 0-5 who are abused and/or neglected feel hurt, sad, hungry, scared and alone and without help face dire consequences for their future.

According to an article entitled, “How Much Does Child Abuse Cost? Study Says $400K Over a Lifetime” written by Jeremy Loudenbeck for the Chronical of Social Change in January 2017, each case of abuse carries a very hefty price tag. Researchers looked at child welfare services, health care, special education services, criminal justice and lifetime productivity. A substantiated case of child abuse incurs nearly $11,000 in costs from child welfare services, nearly $13,000 in special education services, nearly $55, 000 in health care services. Lifetime health consequences for children who suffer from child maltreatment include substance abuse and mental health issues, among many others. See Childhood Adverse Effects Study for more information on serious health consequences for children who suffer from maltreatment at an early age. Victims of child abuse are 28 percent more likely than other children to have an adult criminal record.

El Dorado County is not exempt from child abuse and/or neglect statistics. According to Kids Data.org (a program of the Lucille Packard Foundation for Children’s Health), in 2015, El Dorado County reports to Child Protective Services for general neglect and emotional abuse were higher than the state reporting percentages. Sexual abuse reports were equal to the state reporting percentage. Children ages 0-5 had the highest percentage of reports to Child Protective Services.

We, collectively, as a loving, thriving community can prevent the devastating effects of child maltreatment. Each one of us can support families and their young children by knowing the support services in our communities that assist families that are struggling, promoting the importance of early childhood development, and individually advocating for strong, healthy families through volunteering, supporting, and caring for the children and families of our communities.
Please get involved and remember: Each of us, whether we have anything to do with children or not, is directly affected by how they are treated.

To learn more about the El Dorado County Child Abuse Prevention Council, please call Elizabeth Blakemore, Coordinator at 530-295-2312

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April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. El Dorado County Child Abuse Prevention Counsel encourages all individuals and organizations to play a role in making El Dorado County a better place for children and families. By ensuring that parents have the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to care for their children, we can help prevent child abuse and neglect by making meaningful connections with children, youth and families in our communities.

Research shows that protective factors are present in healthy families. Promoting these factors is among the most effective ways to reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect. They are:

~Nurturing and attachment
~Knowledge of parenting and of child and youth development
~Parental resilience
~Social connections
~Concrete supports for parents
~Social and emotional competence of children
https://www.childwelfare.gov/…/pr…/promoting/protectfactors/

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Welcome to the Hub!

 

What is a Community Hub?

The goal of Community Hubs is to build healthy and strong communities throughout El Dorado County by focusing on prevention. Using the Family Strengthening Protective Factors Framework, we seek to support parents as their child’s first teacher by offering community based activities that engage parents and caregivers in their child’s development, offer parenting resources and connecting to services in times of need. These activities will be offered through Community Hubs.

Community Hubs are more than a location, they are a partnership. Hubs will offer groups and activities for expectant parents and families with children ages 0 -18, staffed by a team of family engagement, literacy and health specialists. Hubs are located at five El Dorado County Library locations: Cameron Park, El Dorado Hills, Georgetown, Placerville, and South Lake Tahoe.

Hub Teams are still being hired. Once in place, team members will visit with your organization to learn more about your community, resources and families.

Click the link below for PDF

Hub_Brochure_HUBS_FINAL

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Break the Cycle

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Science Training for Preschool, Pre-K, TK and Kindergarten Teachers Western Slope/SLT in March!

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